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General Petraeus, in Parwan, Afghanistan

Out to make Afghanistan into the spitting image of American democracy, under the now aging banner, “Operation  Enduring Freedom“, General Petraeus, here seen walking along an American built prison camp wall in Parwan, stated the following:

“We’re on the cusp of beginning, of supporting, the Afghan beginning of reintegration,” General Petraeus said.    NY Times, Sept. 28, 2010

This is the state of American policy in the 9th year of the longest so-called “war” of our history.  We are at the beginning of a cusp.  Is this a distant poetic echo of “Cusper’s” last stand, out in the bleak Little Big Horn River territory?  Or what exactly has the General said?  You got me.

So far 1,305 Americans have officially been indicated as having been killed in Afghanistan; others died after being removed.  This figure includes only military personnel.  Afghan deaths, as usual, are unlisted and whatever numbers are given, they are fuzzy and invariably far lower than reality.


Naturally, those who decide American policy find no ironies in such facts as that America holds more people in prison than any other country, even ones with populations 4 times the size of ours.  More better bigger prisons is our way here, and goldern, it’s gonna be that way there.

Marines in HelmlandPrivatized prison complex, near Phoenix, AZ

Number of US prison population 2,424,279 in 2008

44% of US prisoners are black; 12% of US citizens are black

The present budgetary costs of the entire US prison system is approximately 60 billion dollars a year.   The cost per prisoner comes to $24,000.   The experts’ analysis is that this expense functions to harden and generate more criminal behavior.  Just as American policy in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and elsewhere, produces ever more “terrorists.”

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One Comment

  1. sigh, i wonder how much more “freedom” we can all endure. I lived and hour from fucking bagram airforce base/black prison hell and the lights were so bright at night it felt like I lived next door. I’m know all my afghan friends and the thousands of others in that area really appreciate enduring that freedom.


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