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Moving now too much to keep up.  Since last posting we spent a few days in Toledo, then 5 in Madrid.  Then back to Italy for some days in Bologna, Rome, Matera and then a drive through Basilicata, including through the wonderful park, Pollino, where we stayed in a very nice bed and breakfast.  Then on to Sicily where we’ve been now almost a week.   Driving, we’ve wandered along the north east coast, crammed with Italians in their annual pilgrimage al mare, then up winding roads to small towns perched on mountain tops, where it seems few tourists venture.  So far the trip already has ample stories to tell (see www.jonjost.wordpress.com for some of these) and observations to ponder.   And now, after 2 nights in Enna, we’ve been in Palermo a few days.  The would-be film doesn’t exist and certainly doesn’t look like it will magically materialize.   Time for a brief respite and to gather thoughts.

For the moment just these images:

View from the B&B, near Vigianello, BasilicataFranca, of the B&BThe cook, whose wonderful home-made tortellini we didn’t get to try

The ferry to SicilySome guy trying to start making a film (and failing)View from cheap hotel room in Gioiosa Marea

Now, following a stay in an odd hotel in Gioiosa Marea on the coast, we went inland to Enna, staying at a B&B a few nights, then moving on to Palermo, where we are now and stay a few more days.  It is a place of peculiar character, as anyone who has visited has noted and remarked.  While it seems to me the “crisis” is taking its toll on one of the major businesses here – tourism – there are still too many, and seeing things has become an unpleasant matter of elbowing the group tours aside, paying a lot to enter something worthy of seeing – we just declined for the moment to see the Palatine Chapel as they wanted 10 Euro ($12 or so).  At my age if I had European papers I could go in free, but alas I am a yank and of course the US doesn’t have an exchange for such things.

Cefalu, a beautiful small city destroyed by tourism, wherein Italians go al mare, clustering in higher than urban densities on popular beaches to talk away.


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